Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from July, 2018

What's an Appropriate Curfew for High Schoolers?

Parents Magazine, Jan Faull, MEd, on deciding on a high school curfew for teens.

My sophomore loves to go to parties with juniors and seniors and to stay out late. What's an appropriate curfew for a sophomore in high school? A. It's time to put on your power-parenting persona and open up curfew negotiations. There's no need to worry too much, because deep in your teens' heart, he really wants a reasonable and somewhat flexible curfew. When your teen is out with friends, tired and ready to go home -- or just plain not liking the social scene -- it's difficult to say, "I'm tired, I'm going home." It's easier to say, "My curfew is 12:30. I'll be grounded if I'm not home soon." Despite this fact, you need to bear up as your son, like any self-respecting teenager, will probably moan, stomp, and gripe while claiming, "None of my friends have curfews. You're a control freak." Let your son go on as such, it's his teen…

How to Talk to Your Child About Losing Weight

Does your child need to lose weight? We'll help you talk about it without hurting her feelings. By Jeannette Moninger from  Talking About the Problem For parents of the 25 million overweight or obese kids in the U.S., it's a common dilemma: If your child is fat, she probably knows it. Classmates may tease her, and she probably thinks her clothes are too tight when she looks in the mirror. So when you broach the topic, it's important to be compassionate. "How you discuss a child's weight problem can make a huge difference in helping her deal with it," says Jamie Calabrese, MD, medical director of the Children's Institute in Pittsburgh and a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Task Force on Obesity. Bring It Up Gently Look for a natural time to talk about your child's weight in a low-key way. After a checkup, you might say, "You heard the doctor say you're gaining weight too quickly. Do you want to talk about what…