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The Book- and More- Is in the Mail by Kelly Jensen, SLJ

These YA subscription services offer new titles, community, and fun extras.


The thrill of book subscription boxes is discovering titles and connecting with other readers. Curated boxes contain books that subscribers might otherwise overlook, and "Unboxing" blog posts and videos connect readers, who can communicate with one another about the boxes, and other books they love.


Here's a look at some YA-focused boxes.

FairyLoot 
With a focus on fantasy, each themed FairyLoot box includes a book plus a small selection of items such as specially made scarves, quote prints, and even a Funko POP! A recent package with a
"Whimsical Journeys" theme contained Jessica Leake's Beyond a Darkened Shore".
Cost: About $35 plus shipping. Three- and six-month prepaid subscription plans available.

LitJoy Crate
This box includes  one new release, along with 2 to 4 items. A recent box "Upon Her Throne" 
included Rebecca Ross' The Queen's Rising, an exclusiv…
Recent posts

What's an Appropriate Curfew for High Schoolers?

Parents Magazine, Jan Faull, MEd, on deciding on a high school curfew for teens.

My sophomore loves to go to parties with juniors and seniors and to stay out late. What's an appropriate curfew for a sophomore in high school? A. It's time to put on your power-parenting persona and open up curfew negotiations. There's no need to worry too much, because deep in your teens' heart, he really wants a reasonable and somewhat flexible curfew. When your teen is out with friends, tired and ready to go home -- or just plain not liking the social scene -- it's difficult to say, "I'm tired, I'm going home." It's easier to say, "My curfew is 12:30. I'll be grounded if I'm not home soon." Despite this fact, you need to bear up as your son, like any self-respecting teenager, will probably moan, stomp, and gripe while claiming, "None of my friends have curfews. You're a control freak." Let your son go on as such, it's his teen…

How to Talk to Your Child About Losing Weight

Does your child need to lose weight? We'll help you talk about it without hurting her feelings. By Jeannette Moninger from  Talking About the Problem For parents of the 25 million overweight or obese kids in the U.S., it's a common dilemma: If your child is fat, she probably knows it. Classmates may tease her, and she probably thinks her clothes are too tight when she looks in the mirror. So when you broach the topic, it's important to be compassionate. "How you discuss a child's weight problem can make a huge difference in helping her deal with it," says Jamie Calabrese, MD, medical director of the Children's Institute in Pittsburgh and a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Task Force on Obesity. Bring It Up Gently Look for a natural time to talk about your child's weight in a low-key way. After a checkup, you might say, "You heard the doctor say you're gaining weight too quickly. Do you want to talk about what…

11th Annual Children's & Teen Choice Book Award Winners

And the winners are....


K-2nd Grade Book of the Year:   Poor Louie, written and illustrated by Tony Fucile



3rd- 4th Grade Book of the Year: 50 Wacky Things Animals Do, by Tricia Martineau Wagner, illustrated by Carles Ballesteros


5th-6th Grade Book of the Year: The Losers Club, by Andrew Clements



Teen Book of the Year: The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas



Check them out today!!


Women Who Run the World

Here are some great titles about women who have impacted history!

Awesome Women Who Changed History: Paper Dolls  illustrated by  Carol Del Angel

Bravo! Poems About Amazing Hispanics by Margarita Engle

Fight Like a Girl: 50 Feminists Who Changed the World by Laura Barcella

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Tales of Extraordinary Women by Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo

More Girls Who Rocked the World: Heroines for Ada Lovelace to Misty Copeland by Michelle Roehm McCann

Pathfinders: The Journeys of 16 Extraordinary  Black Souls by Tonya Bolden

Rad American Women A-Z by  Kate Schatz

She Persisted: 13 American Women Who Changed the World by Chelsea Clinton

This Little Trailblazer: A Girl Power Primer by Joan Holub

Women Who Dared: 52 Stories of Fearless Daredevils, Adventurers, & Rebels by Linda Skeers

Enjoy!

Coalitions Find the Keys to Safer Teen Driving

States with a Teen Safe Driving Coalition have lowered the number of car crashes involving teen drivers by 34 percent.

The Short of It Car crashes are the No. 1 killer of teens and half of all teens will be involved in a car crash before graduating high school, according to the National Safety Council (NSC). But states with a Teen Safe Driving Coalition have lowered the number of car crashes involving young drivers by 34 percent. The Lowdown Established by the NSC and The Allstate Foundation, Teen Safe Driving Coalitions have worked at the grassroots level to educate parents and kids about the risks of teen driving and offer solutions for parents to help teens be safer. Comprised of state and local government, law enforcement, public health agencies, traffic safety and injury prevention organizations, academia, businesses, teens, parents and crash survivors, the coalitions exist in California, Florida, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Texas. …

What Teen Shouldn't Do Online if They Want a Job or College Admission

What teens post today can really affect their prospects tomorrow. Coach your kid to stay smart online and avoid jeopardizing coveted opportunities.

Ninety-two percent of teens report going online daily. Thirty-one percent of college admissions officers said they visited an applicant's social networking page to learn more about them, and 93 percent of potential employers view candidates' social profiles before making a hiring decision. More than half of job recruiters have reconsidered a candidate after viewing their social pages, and 30 percent of college admission officers admitted they saw something negative that impacted the student's application. Clearly, what teens post online matters—a lot. Social media posts about illegal drug or alcohol use, guns, and sexual topics, and posts containing improper spelling, bad grammar and profanity have been shown to have the most negative impact. "As parents, we grew up in a different world. But now, kids' life experiences…